Eastern Suburbs

First-Time Voters are playing a big role at this year’s election

By Angelica Rodriguez, BDJ 464.01

Published on November 8, 2016

The Election Inspector Kate Roder sees more First Time Voters this year(c) 2016 Angelica Rodriguez

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What is it like to vote at the Jewish Community Center

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SYRACUSE, N.Y. (Democracy in Action)-   Long drives, classes and confusion with absentee ballots, are not stopping first-time voters to participate in the elections this year.

Molly North is a college sophomore that came all the way from Ithaca to vote at the Jewish Community Center in Syracuse. North says that when she didn’t receive her absentee ballot, she decided to skip classes at Ithaca College and drive one hour to the center because she refuses not to vote.

“I kind off told all my classes that I was not coming in and that I was going to vote today because I always thought it was very important,” said North.

North thinks that people need to understand the importance of voting this year. North says that since the Democrat and Republican parties are so divided, one vote can make a difference.

There has been a big turn out at the polls, many of which are first-time voters like North, Election Inspector Kathy Roder said.

“All of our first-time voters were college students,” said Roder, “so that was great.”


First-time Voters, specially those who are millennials, are essential for the election this year. According to the Pew Research Center, Millennials (ages 18-31) and Baby Boomers (ages 52-70)  make up the largest generations of the U.S. Electorate. Millennials have had the lowest voting turn out in the past elections but this year is unique because this is the first time all Millennials are old enough to vote.


In general, there has been a high turn out in the Jewish Community Center since it opened it doors at 6 a.m. The Jewish Community Center is the voting spot for the Districts 14, 16 and 22. There have been more than 200 ballots already cast and this is expected to keep increasing throughout the day, Poll Site Manager Michael Venditte said.